Childhood obesity latest

Date: 11.10.2018

Schoolzone research for the Jamie Oliver Foundation last year showed that children from less well-off backgrounds struggled to meet school healthy eating policy objectives. We saw children bringing last night’s chips in packed lunches, for example. Schools in more affluent areas were more successful in introducing healthy eating, so NHS research published this week comes as no great surprise, disappointing though it is to see that government strategies to reverse the trend are not yet achieving the success they might hope for.

A record number of 10- and 11-year-olds in England are classed as severely obese, with one in 25 in that category, according to the latest annual findings of the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP).

Between 2006/07 and 2017/18 the gap between obesity prevalence for the most and least deprived areas increased by 5.0 percentage points due to obesity prevalence increasing in the most deprived areas and remaining similar in the least deprived.

Overall, the gap has increased more for boys than girls.

Prevalence of obesity is also greater in urban than in rural areas – which may be related to the social deprivation context.

 

Read the NCMP report here